Cherry Blossoms and Magnolias at RBG

We found a profusion of magnolia blooms at the RBG Arboretum today.

Bugs on magnoliasMagnolias at RBG ArboretumRBG Arboretum Cherry Blossoms and Magnolias

The cherry blossoms weren’t at their peak by the time we came. Someone mentioned that with all the wind and rain they didn’t last as long this year.

Cherry blossoms at the RBG Arboretum

There were also three different colors of Eastern Redbud blooming. It is considered a native species because of one recorded observation on the south end of Pelee Island in 1892 by the Canadian botanist John Macoun. The species name, canadensis, is the Latin form of Canadian.

Redbud trees blooming at the RBG Arboretum

The Starburst magnolias are definitely our new favorites. This species was introduced to the United States in 1862 by Dr. George Robert Hall. It comes from the Ise Bay area of central Honshū, Japan’s largest island. It has a much more delicate flower that some of the other larger, showy, pink blooms.

Starburst Magnolia

There are also two lovely sycamore trees that have huge branches dipping down and touching the ground. This American sycamore is from the 1940’s when the arboretum was opened.

There is a sycamore tree in Windsor that is 225 years old, with branches that are 120 years old. It has been recognized as an Ontario Heritage Tree. Some sycamores have been known to live 500-600 years.

Forests Ontario has an interactive map where you can search Heritage Trees all over Ontario.

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