Red Hill Trail from Mud Street

This morning was misty and wet from all of the rain the night before. Later on there’s the chance of rolling thunderstorms and … more rain.  We hoped to hike a stretch of the Red Hill Trail to the Bruce trail before we got soaked.

Red HIll Valley trail view

The mud along the Red Hill Trail is sticky and slick. Hikers should be extra careful after it’s rained. We noticed many that were out had poles to stabilize themselves.

Decent on Red Hill Valley trail

The trees looked extra moody with a slick of rain on them. This misty light made the green of the new leaves really pop.

Rain wet tree

Once we got down the first hill the terrain leveled out. The trail follows alongside the creek that Albion Falls cascades into. There are several little waterfalls along the route.

Waterfalls, Hamilton Waterfalls, Red Hill Valley Trail

Erosion along the creek bed has left the roots of the trees exposed. Its a reminder of the communication network hidden beneath the soil. Suzanne Simard does an excellent TED talk explaining how trees communicate.

tree roots along Red HIll Valley trail

mini waterfalls along creek

Birding

No trip along any of the trails is complete without a little birding. We had a perfect sighting of an indigo bunting. They are such stunning birds!

birding hamilton, along the bruce trail

It’s amazing how many of the creatures inhabiting the forest, not 10 feet from us, are completely unknown to us. The more we get to know the plants and birds and butterflies the more in awe we are.

There is so much to see if we just decide to look.

Bruce trail in King's Forest

Our intentions were to get to the Escarpment Rail Trail parking sidetrail and take the Mountain Brow side trail back. This meant a nice loop where we would get to see Buttermilk and Albion Falls. Not having a phone with data on it meant we didn’t realize we were almost there when the rain came. We turned around instead and hightailed it back to the car, making it just in time. Heavy rain poured down on us as we drove home.

red hill valley trail to bruce trail

Bruce Trail Invasive Species

We have loved being within walking distance of the Bruce Trail.

stretch of the Bruce Trail
The Bruce Trail app

 

When we first were looking at it I really wanted to thru hike it a la Big Three – the Appalchian, Pacific Crest or Continental Divide hikes.  There’s something so lovely about the idea of just walking for months on end.  Ok, maybe you don’t agree with me, but I’m serious. Unfortunately life kind of gets in the way.

So we’ve been doing the Bruce in stretches because something is better that nothing. There are so many beautiful and interesting things along the way. But there were quite a few things we were unaware of and didn’t expect.

Invasive Species

I was surprised at how many people who live along the Bruce Trail just dump their lawn clippings and thinned out garden plants along the trail. They’re probably thinking that its all plant life and its nature so it doesn’t really matter. But unfortunately this had contributed to the rise of invasive species along the trail systems.

invasive species vinca, greater periwinkle
Invasive Periwinkle along the Red Hill Valley side trails

Periwinkle (vinca minor) has a lovely purple flower and is an excellent spreading ground cover in your garden.  But it is also miraculously resilient. When you decide you don’t like how much its spreading and throw it in the woods it just keeps on groing in its new habitat. English ivy and gout weed will do the same thing.

What can you do about these invasive species?

Effective management of invasive species does not include chucking them in the woods. In most cases, if you don’t have time for intensive management, it’s better not to plant them at all.

Instead you can purchase native or non invasive species. These will grow better and support the local habitat instead of destroying it.

Also if you find invasive species on your hikes you can report it using the Invading Species Hotline at 1-800-563-7711. Or use the app EDDMapS Ontario.

 

P.S. If you want to read an incredibly lovely blog about thru hiking the Hayduke Trail grab your warm beverage of choice, find a comfy spot, and start at the beginning of Catherine Cook’s adventure here.

P.P.S. Her post on the pole of relative inaccessibility was mind widening and unforgotten.