The Bruce Trail Iroqouia Section: Buttermilk Falls to Kennilworth Stairs

This part of our hike included a sidetrail to get onto the Bruce Trail Iroqouia section from Buttermilk falls. You’ll see the blue blazes showing the trail from the Falls that leads through the woods along the top of the escarpment running parallel to Mountain Brow Blvd.  You’ll hit a crossroads which directs you left, to the Rail Trail, or right, down the escarpment and meeting up with the Bruce. This is the trail we were following when the rain caught us and we turned back, not knowing how close we were.

Bruce trail sidetrail near Mountain Brow Blvd.
Heading down the Escarpment

At the base of the escarpment the trail comes out of the forest and into open meadow running along the King’s Forest Golf Course border.

Sunny open stretches running beside the King’s Forest Golf Course
Sumac thicket

Wildflowers and Mushrooms

This section of the trail had an abundance of wildflowers and butterflies, especially in the sunny areas. We saw swallowtails as well as tiny blue butterflies/moths. I thought they would be easy to identify but there are several small blue guys in Ontario so I’ll have to try and get a picture for a better identification. There are about 750 species of butterflies recorded in Canada.  Each time we head out there’s something new to discover.

greater celandine, spreading dogbane, wild grape, herb robert
1) Greater celandine, Chelidonium majus 2) Spreading dogbane, Apocynum androsaemifolium L. 3) Wild grape, Vitis riparia 4) Herb robert, Geranium Robertianum
1) Alsike clover, Trifolium hybridium L. 2) Common Fleabane, Erigeron philadelphicus 3) Wild phlox, Phlox divaricata 4) Unsure? Milkweed or Joe Pye weed possibly
1) Viper’s Bugloss, Echium vulgare 2) Black Locust, Robinia pseudoacacia 3) Wild Violet, Viola odorata 4) Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis
Top left clockwise to bottom left 1) Possibly Fairy Ring Mushroom 2) Unsure 3) Unsure 4) Possibly Ink cap or Shaggy Mane 5) Unsure

There’s quite a bit of red, iron rich, soil exposed here, giving the Red Hill Valley its name.

So Many Stairs

This route continues to run parallel to Mountain Brow Blvd, and part of the Rail Trail, with stairs leading up or down in a couple places accessing Greenhill and Fennel Ave. As we rounded the Escarpment heading northwest we hit our first set of stairs at the Kennilworth Access.

Kennilworth Access – 387 stairs
Panorama from the stairs

At this point the trail runs high enough to get an overview of King Street East.

Books I Want to Read

Monarchs and Milkweed: A Migrating Butterfly, A Poisonous Plant and Their Remarkable Story of Coevolution by Anurag Agrawal

The Monarch: Saving Our Most-Loved Butterfly by Kylee Baumle

Part 2 Kennilworth Stairs to Cliffview Park

Mushrooms at Tiny Marsh

While hiking the Tiny Marsh trails we came across a few mushroom species that I wanted to identify.

Dryad's Saddle

These mushrooms were found on dead logs along the trail to the east of the Visitor Center.  I believe them to be Dryad’s Saddle or Pheasant Back mushrooms (Polyporus squamosus).

Dryad's Saddle

Dryad’s Saddle

William Hudson, a British botanist, was the first to describe them scientifically in 1778. It’s current name was given by French mycologist Lucien Quelet in 1886. A mycologist specializes in the study of fungi, their uses and dangers associated.

This mushroom likes dead wood, especially elms, but will sometimes grow on live trees like maples. When we’ve come across them in the Hamilton area they seem to grow more on maples then anything else. Wet areas can have a profusion and they will come back year after year until the tree is completely gone.

dryad's saddle mushroom at Tiny Marsh

They are a common sight in May and June but may be found later in the year. If you read more about them the young mushrooms are considered a good edible. Please be very careful with wild mushrooms though. Many have similar looking deadly counterparts. Your best bet is to find someone who knows before you try any. Mushroom-collecting.com suggests they have a flavour unlike any other.

Unknown Fungus

We also came across this specimen near the Dryad’s saddle. It was much closer to the ground and kind of hidden in the leaf litter.

I tried every search term I could think of to come up with an identification but couldn’t find it. Lots of bats though. “Brown and white fungi Ontario June” apparently means bats.

Mushrooms at Tiny Marsh

If any of you can identify this guy for me I would appreciate it.

Mushroom Resources

If you’re interested in finding out some more information about mushrooms locally here are some good resources.

The Mycological Society of Toronto provides information as well as guided forays in the Toronto area for members. You can take a mushroom identification course and participate in workshops and field trips.

National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms

Books I want to Read

Mycophilia: Revelations from the Weird World of Mushrooms by Eugenia Bone

Mushrooming Without Fear: The Beginner’s Guide to Collecting Safe and Delicious Mushrooms by Alexander Schwab

The Complete Mushroom Hunter, Revised: Illustrated Guide to Foraging, Harvesting and Enjoying Wild Mushrooms by Gary Lincoff

 

Part 1 Tiny Marsh Hike

Part 2 Tiny Marsh Turtles