Albion Falls and Buttermilk Falls along the Bruce Trail

Today we decided to hike the sidetrail of the Bruce that takes you past Albion Falls and Buttermilk Falls. We had already hiked the Bruce proper through the King’s Forest but wanted to do this stretch just to see the falls.

Problems at the Falls

In our hike last month we had passed the Red Hill Creek that this waterfall feeds. I wanted to go up river, towards where I knew the waterfall was, but there were signs posted for $10 000 fines if you passed a certain point. This time round there were signs posted everywhere at the top of the waterfalls too.

After doing a bit of research I soon found out why. While trying to take pictures, or just exploring the falls, several people have been seriously injured or died. In one incident last year 1 man died and 2 people needed to be rope-rescued by firefighters. It can take up to 30 firefighters, a dozen EMS workers and police officers, four hours to conduct a single rope rescue. Each rescue costs the city roughly $5 000.

So understandably you can’t get very close to any of the Falls in Hamilton any more.  I had seen so many cool pictures of people right under Albion Falls. We, however, enjoyed them from afar.

Albion Falls

Albion Falls Hamilton Ontario
Albion Falls, Hamilton Ontario

Other than being the second worst falls in Hamilton for people injuring themselves at, its a pretty straightforward 19 m cascade waterfall. I think it would be better right after some rain or during early spring with all of the snow starting to melt.

You get good views from both platforms, albeit a little far away.  There are benches if you want to sit and relax and enjoy a cup of tea. I wish I had my other camera and my zoom lens for a better shot, but phone camera it was.

Map of trails around Albion and Buttermilk Falls
Map of trails around Albion and Buttermilk Falls

The sidetrail continues past Albion Falls, along the top of the Escarpment, to Buttermilk Falls.

Buttermilk Falls

Unfortunately this falls was a let down. It wasn’t really flowing at the time and because of some serious overgrowth you couldn’t see much of it.

Buttermilk Falls Hamilton Ontario
Buttermilk Falls

Possibly with more rain or spring runoff there would be a better falls but I don’t think this one is worth making a special trip for.

The Bruce Trail Iroqouia Section: Buttermilk Falls to Kennilworth Stairs

This part of our hike included a sidetrail to get onto the Bruce Trail Iroqouia section from Buttermilk falls. You’ll see the blue blazes showing the trail from the Falls that leads through the woods along the top of the escarpment running parallel to Mountain Brow Blvd.  You’ll hit a crossroads which directs you left, to the Rail Trail, or right, down the escarpment and meeting up with the Bruce. This is the trail we were following when the rain caught us and we turned back, not knowing how close we were.

Bruce trail sidetrail near Mountain Brow Blvd.
Heading down the Escarpment

At the base of the escarpment the trail comes out of the forest and into open meadow running along the King’s Forest Golf Course border.

Sunny open stretches running beside the King’s Forest Golf Course
Sumac thicket

Wildflowers and Mushrooms

This section of the trail had an abundance of wildflowers and butterflies, especially in the sunny areas. We saw swallowtails as well as tiny blue butterflies/moths. I thought they would be easy to identify but there are several small blue guys in Ontario so I’ll have to try and get a picture for a better identification. There are about 750 species of butterflies recorded in Canada.  Each time we head out there’s something new to discover.

greater celandine, spreading dogbane, wild grape, herb robert
1) Greater celandine, Chelidonium majus 2) Spreading dogbane, Apocynum androsaemifolium L. 3) Wild grape, Vitis riparia 4) Herb robert, Geranium Robertianum
1) Alsike clover, Trifolium hybridium L. 2) Common Fleabane, Erigeron philadelphicus 3) Wild phlox, Phlox divaricata 4) Unsure? Milkweed or Joe Pye weed possibly
1) Viper’s Bugloss, Echium vulgare 2) Black Locust, Robinia pseudoacacia 3) Wild Violet, Viola odorata 4) Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis
Top left clockwise to bottom left 1) Possibly Fairy Ring Mushroom 2) Unsure 3) Unsure 4) Possibly Ink cap or Shaggy Mane 5) Unsure

There’s quite a bit of red, iron rich, soil exposed here, giving the Red Hill Valley its name.

So Many Stairs

This route continues to run parallel to Mountain Brow Blvd, and part of the Rail Trail, with stairs leading up or down in a couple places accessing Greenhill and Fennel Ave. As we rounded the Escarpment heading northwest we hit our first set of stairs at the Kennilworth Access.

Kennilworth Access – 387 stairs
Panorama from the stairs

At this point the trail runs high enough to get an overview of King Street East.

Books I Want to Read

Monarchs and Milkweed: A Migrating Butterfly, A Poisonous Plant and Their Remarkable Story of Coevolution by Anurag Agrawal

The Monarch: Saving Our Most-Loved Butterfly by Kylee Baumle

Part 2 Kennilworth Stairs to Cliffview Park

Red Hill Trail from Mud Street

This morning was misty and wet from all of the rain the night before. Later on there’s the chance of rolling thunderstorms and … more rain.  We hoped to hike a stretch of the Red Hill Trail to the Bruce trail before we got soaked.

Red HIll Valley trail view

The mud along the Red Hill Trail is sticky and slick. Hikers should be extra careful after it’s rained. We noticed many that were out had poles to stabilize themselves.

Decent on Red Hill Valley trail

The trees looked extra moody with a slick of rain on them. This misty light made the green of the new leaves really pop.

Rain wet tree

Once we got down the first hill the terrain leveled out. The trail follows alongside the creek that Albion Falls cascades into. There are several little waterfalls along the route.

Waterfalls, Hamilton Waterfalls, Red Hill Valley Trail

Erosion along the creek bed has left the roots of the trees exposed. Its a reminder of the communication network hidden beneath the soil. Suzanne Simard does an excellent TED talk explaining how trees communicate.

tree roots along Red HIll Valley trail

mini waterfalls along creek

Birding

No trip along any of the trails is complete without a little birding. We had a perfect sighting of an indigo bunting. They are such stunning birds!

birding hamilton, along the bruce trail

It’s amazing how many of the creatures inhabiting the forest, not 10 feet from us, are completely unknown to us. The more we get to know the plants and birds and butterflies the more in awe we are.

There is so much to see if we just decide to look.

Bruce trail in King's Forest

Our intentions were to get to the Escarpment Rail Trail parking sidetrail and take the Mountain Brow side trail back. This meant a nice loop where we would get to see Buttermilk and Albion Falls. Not having a phone with data on it meant we didn’t realize we were almost there when the rain came. We turned around instead and hightailed it back to the car, making it just in time. Heavy rain poured down on us as we drove home.

red hill valley trail to bruce trail

Tulips at Edwards Gardens

The tulips at Edwards Gardens today were stunning.

If you’ve never been I would definitely suggest going. Parking is free and there are so many beautiful trails to enjoy. There are also many wheelchair accessible areas to enjoy.

Red, yellow and orange tulips and narcissus at Edwards Gardens

Trailing redbud tree and white narcissus at Edwards Gardens
Trailing redbud tree and white narcissus at Edwards Gardens
Violets, azalea and magnolias at Edwards Gardens
Violets, azalea and magnolias at Edwards Gardens

The local wild life is very friendly, and used to being fed. Please do not feed them though.

Bruce Trail from Felker’s Falls

We did a small stretch of the Bruce trail this afternoon.

Bruce Trail maker, sign, badge

We started at the Felker’s Falls entrance. There’s a parking lot there for anyone who needs to drive here. Fortunately we’re close enough to walk.

Felkers Falls

Wildflowers

There were so many spring wildflowers blooming along the way.

spring wildflowers along the Bruce trail

Violets, apple blossoms and trilliums were everywhere. There are also quite a few I don’t know so I’m going to have to find out what they are. We also saw a coyote maybe 50 feet away from us, and he was beautiful.

Espace Felix Leclerc Walking Trail

On Orleans Island, 15 minutes east of Quebec City, there is a lovely walking trail from Espace Felix Leclerc down towards the river.

It commemorates the life of songwriter, poet and playwright Felix Leclerc.

The trail may not be for everyone because there are some steeper parts.

You begin in a field, basically, where they are starting an arboretum. After this sunny stretch you reach the shade of the escarpment. The path here is steep taking you down to another plateau.  This plateau is partly in sunny field and then enters the old growth forest. Many trees are marked to help you learn more about the local flora. There is still another terrace down before you get to the St Lawrence but the path ends before that. You can continue, but, the paths quickly ends in swamp.